FAQ

We’ve put together a collection of Frequently Asked Questions FAQs ….

General FAQ's

Sometimes called the Fire Safety Order (FSO) or the RRO, the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order states that any person, who has some level of control of premises, must take reasonable steps to reduce the risk from fire and ensure that everyone who may be on the premises, at the time of the fire, can escape safely. Read more.

Under the RRO the Responsible Person must appoint a competent person to assist him in undertaking the preventative and protective measures (RRO 18.1). BS 5839-1 suggests that Competence of a fire alarm servicing organization can be assured by the use of organizations that are third-party certificated, by a UKAS-certified certification body i.e. BAFE.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Optio, neque qui velit. Magni dolorum quidem ipsam eligendi, totam, facilis laudantium cum accusamus ullam voluptatibus commodi numquam, error, est. Ea, consequatur.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Optio, neque qui velit. Magni dolorum quidem ipsam eligendi, totam, facilis laudantium cum accusamus ullam voluptatibus commodi numquam, error, est. Ea, consequatur.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Optio, neque qui velit. Magni dolorum quidem ipsam eligendi, totam, facilis laudantium cum accusamus ullam voluptatibus commodi numquam, error, est. Ea, consequatur.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Optio, neque qui velit. Magni dolorum quidem ipsam eligendi, totam, facilis laudantium cum accusamus ullam voluptatibus commodi numquam, error, est. Ea, consequatur.

Passive fire protection is built into the structure of a building, functioning at all times and is only required in the event of a fire. Active fire protection is the detector, it requires a cue for it to work, this then sets off a product, such as a fire alarm or a sprinkler.

Passive fire protection reduces the spread of the fire and the risk of the fire. Passive fire protection is designed so people can escape safely in the event of a fire. It also limits the damage done to buildings and prevents total losses.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Optio, neque qui velit. Magni dolorum quidem ipsam eligendi, totam, facilis laudantium cum accusamus ullam voluptatibus commodi numquam, error, est. Ea, consequatur.

When it comes to fire stopping, any compartment which has a service penetration or void is useless in the event of a fire.

The Regulatory Reform Order (RRO) provides the overarching regulations. There is also building regulations and approved guidance (Approved Document B) to satisfy the direction, as well as alternative routes such as BS9999.

Only people with proven competence and 3rd party accreditation should be trusted to do so.

Fire Risk Assessment FAQ's

Fire risk assessment is the systematic evaluation within a building or premises, finding the factors which determine; the hazard from fire, the likelihood that there will be a fire and the consequences if one were to occur. Both qualitative and quantitative methods of risks are assessed under the current British Standards, PAS 79-1:2020.

The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 requires a non-domestic premises to have an in-date fire risk assessment at all times. This includes measures to reduce or eliminate the risk of fire, and identify any persons at risk.

By law it states that a ‘competent person’ must undertake the fire risk assessment, this includes the building’s ‘responsible person’, who may have no formal fire safety training, beyond the help of standard fire safety risk assessment guidelines. This can in some instances lead to insufficient and potentially dangerous fire risk assessments.

A fire risk assessment should be reviewed and renewed on an annual basis. This is to make sure the integrity of the building isn’t compromised in any way.

A fire risk assessment contains the following:

  • Identify the fire hazards
  • Identify the people at risk
  • Evaluate, remove or reduce the risks
  • Record findings, prepare an emergency plan and provide training
  • Review and update the fire risk assessment regularly

Type 4 - common parts and flats (destructive) requires a contractor to be present to open up any construction for inspection, and to make it right after the inspection and testing have been carried out. These tests and inspections often occur in flats that are vacant.

Fire Door FAQ's

Commercial buildings are defined in Approved Document B volume 2. Fire doors are required in set locations in commercial buildings to fulfil the functional requirements of the building regulations.

Fire doors are crucial in protecting the means of escape in any building which allows a safe escape through exits. They are crucial in buildings that have a ‘stay out’ fire plan, as they provide the means to seek refuge in a compartment. The majority of fire doors are designed to stay closed at all times, whilst some doors are designed to stay open and then close automatically in the event of a fire.

A fire door inspection is a defined process whereby you confirm the door set installed will perform in the event of a fire. This is done by inspecting all components along a pass/fail protocol.

Inspections of fire doors can vary in time scales. Factors to take into consideration:

  • Documentation available 
  • Intrusive checks
  • Access control
  • Door locations
  • Layout of building
  • Age of doors

An action plan is required when a fire door fails inspection. The issues need to be addressed within an acceptable time frame.

Fire Doors are only to be installed by a competent fire door installer with necessary training. One way of going about this is using companies that hold 3rd party certificates.

Fire Door repairs are only to be carried out by a competent installer who has the relevant knowledge and experience.

Yes, a sign off process is a good practice to have so that the installation meets the requirements of the manufacturer of the supplied fire door.

Compartmentation FAQ's

Compartmentation is the subdividing of buildings into a number of compartments.

To prevent the spread of fire by containing it within the room of origin.

Regulations say that your building needs to be safe in the event of a fire, this includes having compartmentation built within the structure. Compartmentation is not required in domestic premises unless there is a loft, according to the Regulatory Reform Order (RRO).

There is a defined process where you will identify defects and faults in existing compartmentation against a set of agreed protocols.

Get in touch

Site Enquiry

Start a project